What I Wish I Wearing 1-3

In today’s What I Wish I Wearing post, I was inspired by the humble white shirt. It’s a must have staple in any closet, as it can be paired with endless combinations for both day and night! I started today’s ensemble with a white shirt that had a bit of a unique spin from Sheike, it features a scallop hem with a button-less front (that means no front gapes ladies!). Although it is approaching winter here in Australia, I though it would still be fun to pair it with a cool tropical print pant, this print however has an almost camo vibe, so not too bright or loud, perfectly subdued for the cooler months. And because it’s getting a lot cooler, you need some sort of cover up for when you’re stepping outside, so this grey cape jacket from Country Road was definitely a must. I accessorised the whole look with a super cute shoulder bag from my new favourite designer bag brand Milli Millu, gold lariat style necklace, camel coloured suede heels and the perfect cat’s eyes sunglasses to top it all off!

Let me know if you own a classic white shirt and how you pair it in your everyday outfits. Stay stylish ladies.

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<<1>> necklace <<2>> shirt <<3>> pants <<4>> jacket <<5>> sunglasses <<6>>heels 

Lisa Shearer

What I wish I was wearing 1-2

When I saw this chic spotted apricot coloured maxi dress by Giselle available from Paddo to Palmy , I instantly knew I wanted to include it as part of my What I Wish I Was Wearing series. It looks so fun (perfect for the warmer months ahead), and would definitely flatter all types of figure due to all the draping detail on it. Today I’ve styled this dress with the Mollini Jayman leather lace up heels that I have also been obsessing over lately, I’ve put it on my wish list for my go to heels this summer. And would I be greedy to admit, that I want one in every colour?! I wanted to create a boho vibe with a preppy spin with the rest of the pieces I chose to pair it with. This dress is so versatile and would be perfect to wear on a lunch date, garden party or attending a spring wedding.

<<1>> necklace <<2>> dress <<3>> hat <<4>> sunglasses <<5>> bag <<6>>heels 

Lisa Shearer

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Indigo Blues

Although spring has definitely sprung (I’m writing this as my nose has let loose with a canon of sneezes). You’d think at this point in time I’d find myself gravitating towards shades of pastels, greens and crisp whites to welcome in the new season. Nope, for some reason I am finding mass appeal in the inky hues of indigo, this mysterious colour screams all sorts of sophistication, I instantly feel myself relaxing just at the sight of this colour. Pair it with textured timbers, a glint of aged metal, honed marble and crisp whites and you have a space you’ll never get tired of. Today I’ve compiled some of my favourite interiors that have showcased this moody colour oh so well.

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Let me know which room is your favourite.

Lisa Shearer

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What I wish I was wearing 1-1

I adore stripes, it is a pattern that remains a staple in my closet and it seems to be a classic among high street fashion, being released season after season. I love the detailing at the back of this Witchery top, it’s so unexpected, but truly does elevate what would normally be a plain old stripe top. There is definitely a lot of different ways you could style this top, but today I’m pairing it with classic moto slim leg pants, black boots, a patterned scarf, grey bucket leather bag, then add the little details and accessorise with a rose gold watch and cute drop earrings.

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<<1>> top <<2>> pants <<3>> earrings <<4>> scarf <<5>> watch <<6>>bag <<7>>boots

Let me know how many stripe tops you own and how you style them.

Lisa Shearer

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Colour Series – the colour wheel

Growing up I have always had a fascination and love of colour. I’m drawn to colour in all forms of design, especially textiles, graphic and fashion. Being my first blog post I wanted to dedicate it to this all encompassing element of design that effects the way in which we view our world. This is the first post in a series called Colour Series. In this series I will address everything from how to Create A Mood With Colour through to how to Use Colour To Create Different Interior Styles. But let’s start with the very basic, and let me introduce you to my friend, the colour wheel.

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The colour wheel is a great starting point for understanding the rules about colour and is one of the most useful tool when it comes to art or design. Working as a colour consultant and interior decorator, although I intuitively understand colour combinations, I still sometimes rely  on these rules to develop schemes that work and make rooms and spaces look visually attractive. 

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The fundamentals of colour theory are based on the colour wheel above. Do you remember learning in art class at school what the primary colours were? Well they are red,  yellow and blue, they are called primary colours as they cannot be produced by mixing any other colours together. The secondary colours of green, purple and orange are made by mixing the primaries – red and yellow to make orange; blue and yellow to make green; and red and blue to make purple. Colours become interesting when you mix just a small amount of one colour with more of another. For example, yellow and blue make green but if you just add the smallest touch of blue to the yellow, you will create a really striking cool yellow with just a hint of green. If you mix in a lot more blue you will have turquoise that is just bordering on being completely blue. 

Tertiary colours are made by intermixing the secondary colours. As an interior decorators, I love these as they become muted, more subtle and easy to work with. The mixing process is referred to as subtractive colour. If you start with a colour, for example red, and then mix it with other colours, you are taking away part of the original one. If you mix a colour with its complementary (the one directly opposite on the colour wheel), each colour will have some of its origin taken away until you end up with a form of brown. If you mix all of the paint colours in the wheel together, you will end up with black.

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You can also tint each colour with white to make it progressively lighter or add grey, black or the colour’s complementary to create a shade. You don’t need to remember all this theory to make attractive schemes but it is useful to understand it when trying to figure out why some colours you’ve selected for your room don’t look good together. 

I hope you have enjoyed learning about the colour wheel, it is such handy tool to use when you’re stuck and need help deciding on a beautiful colour scheme for your interior decorating project. Join me next time when I’ll be be discussing the types of colour schemes that can be created using the colour wheel, as well as give you examples of these applied in interior spaces.

Whether it be for your art project, scrapbooking, or home decorating, let me know if you still refer to the colour wheel for your projects.

 

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